Allergy Treatment & Honey Q&A

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Here's a collection of questions related to Allergy Treatment and Honey that visitors of Benefits of Honey have asked via the Just Ask Page.

Check out if these answer your most pressing question.

Question: Some people said "Have you ever heard that one must NOT mix soy drink with honey? That is bad for your health!" Have you heard of that or just another "Asian' myth?

Reply: Yes, I have been warned before that honey should not be taken with any soy-made foods, such as soya bean drinks, toufu, bean curd, etc, as the mixture could produce some toxins which in turn would lead to stomach upset and diarrhea. I've no idea how true this as I have never encountered this problem myself and the people around me also don't seem to have a problem with it.

Question: How much honey per day should I eat to reap the benefits for fighting spring time allergies?

Reply: Take 1-2 teaspoons of local honey a day, prior to the pollen season. The nearer the honey source to the area you are residing in, the better.

Question: After eating honey, I have a lot of gas in stomach, and had to rush for the toilet a few times. Why is this happening?

Reply: I don't have a scientific explanation for the severe gas in your stomach, but I have been told by a honey seller before that a minority has experienced temporary setbacks like body ache, fever, flu, diarrhoea or breaking of wind. However all of them were fine after a few days. The honey retailer believed that such reactions are normal; i.e. the honey is working and the body is reacting to the various healing effects of honey. My advice is you can continue taking honey but in smaller doses. If the honey quality is not a suspect, and if the discomfort does not go away after a few days, stop taking honey and consult your doctor.

Question: What are the allergy symptoms of honey? Question: I take local honey everyday for my allergies. It doesn't seem to be helping. Is this theory just a myth?

Reply: Honey is an old home remedy with benefits long known since ancient time even until today. Though many of its applications might not be supported by modern science, many people have tried and found it to be medically beneficial in many ways. On the same note, the use of local honey to counter allergy has been found to be useful for some people. As suggested in my website Honey Allergy , concerning any medical health issues, it's wise to ask and consult your doctor regarding the use of local honey and also to ascertain that your allergies are due to the pollens in your environment. Your doctor might have a better solution for your allergies than using local honey.

Question: What are the allergy symptoms of honey?

Reply: Honey allergies are rare. Unprocessed raw honey may contain residual proteins which are pollens from the plants the bees visited. And as we all know, proteins are connected to most food allergies. Honey, which is mainly simple sugars, contain very minute amount of protein. Read details in Honey Allergy .

Question: Do you give babies under one years of age honey? If not, why?

Reply: Never feed babies under one with honey. Their digestive system are not developed enough to handle botulinum spores which could be present in some honey. And this could cause them serious food poisoning. Read details in: Honey and Infant .

Question: I am very allergic to bee stings but would like to add honey to my diet - is there any problem with this?

Reply: In this case, you'll need to be careful of any bee products, including honey, though I've also many people who are are allergic to bee stings but are fine with eating honey. You might want to go slow and take honey in very tiny quantity first to monitor on your reaction and increase the dosage bit by bit as you go along. Otherwise, go to your doctor for some tests to determine if your are also allergic to bee products.

End of "Allergy Treatment & Honey Q&A". Back to "Honey Allergy?"

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